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January 9, 2011 @ 7:08 pm

What to ask your surgeon before getting anti-aging treatments

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Dr. Ramtin Kassir who is double board certified by both the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the American Board of Ear, Nose & Throat joined the show. He discussed with Eric Michaels about why do some look better and others look worse after getting anti-aging treatments. What questions should a patient ask their surgeon before getting anti-aging treatments and much more...


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


About Dr. Ramtin Kassir


Ramtin Kassir, M.D., F.A.C.S., has been in private practice since 1997 and has extensive experience in the fields of facial plastic and cosmetic surgery, endoscopic surgery and laser surgery. Dr. Ramtin Kassir is double board certified by both the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the American Board of Otolaryngology and is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. As a talented artist and sculptor, Dr. Kassir was chosen as “Surgeon of the World” for The Healers of the World Through Jesus Christ – a foundation that organizes medical missions in the Far East. Dr. Kassir has published many works in his area of expertise and is a national speaker here and abroad. Dr. Kassir has been interviewed in national TV outlets including FOX News Channel to Bravo to being published in national publications including the New York Times, In Touch Weekly, Star magazine, Plastic Surgery Practice to internationally.


Contact, Location & Info Sources:


Ramtin Kassir, MD,
FACS Double Board Certified Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon Chairman
St. Joseph's Wayne Hospital Department of Otolaryngology Director
Mona Lisa Cosmetic Surgery Center Director
NY/NJ Snoring and Sinus
1176 Hamburg Turnpike, Wayne, NJ 07470
799 Park Ave, NY, NY 10021
81 N. Maple Ave, Ridgewood, NJ 07450
(973) 692-9300
www.drkassir.com
www.njsnoringandsinus.com
www.nysnoringandsinus.com


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Edited Transcript of Interview with Dr. Ramtin Kassir


Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Eric Michaels: Why do some look better and others look worse after getting anti-aging treatments?


Dr. Ramtin: I think patient genetics are and facial aesthetics are first and foremost - it's like a canvas, the better the canvas you have to work with the better the end result and of course it is what somebody is getting done and who is doing it. Today there's are a lot of, if you will - imposter's in terms of positions and non-positions and claiming to do anti-aging aesthetic treatment and even with doctors, patients and celebrities are going in and absolutely over doing things like inject-able fillers all the way up to surgery...


Eric Michaels: What qualities in a patient predict the best results?


Dr. Ramtin: The qualities that we look for first are realistic expectations. Those have to be in line with what there goals are for example...if a patient comes in what is their age, what really bothers them, do they want a nose job, do they want to look ten years younger, so you have to really interview the patient and ask them what their goals are...and they have to decide and it will depend on whether they need surgery or not...


Eric Michaels: What questions should a patient ask their surgeon before getting anti-aging treatments?


Dr. Ramtin: This is a great question to and I think it's an important one. First you have to really ask your surgeon what their qualifications are, what board certifications do they have. Core physicians that do this are facial plastic surgeons such as myself, general plastic surgeons and some dermatologist. These physicians are the best trained...


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Want the entire audio version of this eHealth Radio Episode? Dr. Ramtin Kassir discusses & answers:

  • What are the newest non-invasive face lifts?
  • Is it possible to put off a face lift?
  • Special Conclusion Tip...


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Skin Care · Comments

January 8, 2011 @ 10:34 pm

Helping you find the healthier brands!

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Founder of The Healthy Beauty Project and Beauty Expert Todra Payne joined the show. She discussed with host Eric Michaels about the safety of cosmetics, and how to her company helps you find healthier brands.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Launching a 15-year career by painting the face of Mariah Carey, Todra Payne has helped thousands of women maximize their natural beauty with makeup. Her work has graced the pages of A-list publications such as Elle, Women’s Wear Daily, Harpers Bazaar, O Magazine, and Newsweek. Her exceptional artistic skill and reputation as an industry insider enabled her to work with some of the most notable people in the entertainment, news and fashion industries including Kimora Lee, Soledad O’Brien, and Donna Karan.

A champion for small brands and safe industry practices, Todra recently launched The Healthy Beauty Project – a fun, online destination where women learn the latest news about non-toxic beauty products. The site features step-by-step makeup videos, travel segments to plush organic day spas and interviews with beauty brand owners dedicated to healthy practices.

When Todra isn’t working for national advertising campaigns or writing beauty articles for magazines, she’s traveling the country searching for the latest innovations and tirelessly testing products. Her goal is to provide her audience with the healthiest options in cosmetics that help women look amazing. You can contact Todra via email at todra@healthybeautyproject.com.


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Edited Transcript of Interview with Todra Payne


Eric Michaels: It seems there’s a lot of concern today about the safety of cosmetics. And personal care brands are making a lot of claims about natural ingredients. Why would you say it’s becoming so popular?
Todra Payne: The concern about the health aspect of beauty and personal care items is a part of the bigger health picture. As we’re asking questions about what’s in our food, What are GMOs, how important is organic – we’re also looking at other parts of our lives – like our personal care items. What am I putting in my body when I use this shampoo or apply this blush.


Eric Michaels: Do you think it’s a trend or something that will make a real impact on how Americans shop?
Todra Payne: A few years ago trend experts were saying natural beauty products were a very small niche, but market studies today are showing that the natural beauty sector is growing faster than any other in the beauty industry. And unfortunately, even brands that don’t have a commitment to reformulating their products to use less harsh ingredients are trying to cash in on the natural products market. So consumers have to be a little bit savvy to know the difference in truly healthy products and advertising fluff.


Eric Michaels: Does your company, The Healthy Beauty Project, help consumers find the healthier brands?
Todra Payne: Yes. We discover small, family owned cosmetic companies that produce products in small batches, sometimes from their own certified organic farms and connect those brands with consumers who are looking for the healthiest personal care options out there. We also have a phone app in development that will assist shoppers in making healthier choices. We have ebooks in the works, as well.


Eric Michaels: Are you finding this is something just women care about or are men seeking healthier products, as well?
Todra Payne: Men’s skincare overall is one of the fastest growing segments for the beauty industry – especially anti-aging products. Because men are just starting to get beyond the traditional shaving products into more cosmetic products, it’s too early to tell how savvy they are about natural versus mainstream. But we do get letters from men asking for recommendations about natural brands. But 85% of the household shopping – this includes personal care items – are done by women. So, I’m sure as women grasp the healthy concept full force, men will be educated on the importance of what goes on the body ends up in the body.


Eric Michaels: Is there a tip you can give shoppers to help them with finding the best quality products?
Todra Payne: Right now, the best thing that I can say is if you want to use products with natural and organic ingredients, look for the USDA certified organic seal. It’s the surest way to know what’s in the product.


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Want audio version of this eHealth Radio episode with Todra Payne?


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Skin Care · Comments

January 8, 2011 @ 9:43 am

Common ingredients in skin care products might cause cancer?

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Meredith Kerekes, Beauty industry expert, branding consultant, creator and editor of the popular natural beauty blog, Blueberries + Bronzer joined the show. She discusses the ingredients in beauty products and what we should know about them.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Beauty industry expert and branding consultant, Meredith C. Kerekes has over 10 years experience working with companies as varied as P&G Prestige, Per-fekt Beauty and Estee Lauder. Founder of beauty brand consultancy, The Artisan Groupe; Meredith enjoys working with startups and foreign brands on successfully entering and thriving in the competitive domestic prestige personal care market.

A graduate of the University of Michigan business school, Meredith participated in the European Fragrance and Cosmetic Master program at the Universita degli Studi di Padova, Italy with a focus in luxury goods brand management. She is also the creator and editor of popular natural beauty blog, Blueberries + Bronzer.


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Edited Transcript of Interview with Meredith Kerekes


Eric Michaels: What’s really in most skin care products?
Meredith Kerekes: The majority of conventional skincare products are made up of water, preservatives, emulsifiers, fragrance and a small amount of what are called active ingredients. These active ingredients are the emollients, humectants and compounds that are performing the product’s claims – to moisturize, brighten, reduce wrinkles, firm, etc. To be an effective product, you want to ensure that there is a high concentration of active ingredients in the formula. Get to know the INCI name (International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients) of some common actives like Vitamin A (Retinyl Palmitate), Vitamin E (Tocopherol) and Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid). You want to read the labels of your products to ensure you’re not spending $50 on an anti-wrinkle cream that’s all preservatives, emulsifiers and water.


Eric Michaels: If there are so few actives in most products, what is the rest of the formula made up of?
Meredith Kerekes: Speaking for lotions and creams - water, emulsifiers, preservatives and fragrance. All lotions and creams are emulsions or a mixture of 2 or more unblendable liquids. In skin care products, we’re talking mostly about oil and water. So to create those fluffy lotions or rich creams, we need to add an emulsifier to bind the oil and water together, otherwise it would separate or break, like a vinaigrette salad dressing for example. Common emulsifiers are emulsifying wax, cetyl alcohol or xanthan gum. Preservatives are used to prevent the growth of microbes and extend the shelf life of products. Common preservatives used in cosmetics are parabens (though there is controversy over their use since recent evidence of a possible link between the use of parabens and cancer emerged), phenoxyethanol and tocopherol or Vitamin E. Many skin care products are also scented and that is listed as Fragrance or Parfum on the label.


Eric Michaels: Wait a minute. Cancer? Common ingredients in skin care products might cause cancer?
Meredith Kerekes: Well, there is a lot of discussion lately about parabens. Parabens are the most commonly used preservative in cosmetics today. They’re found in almost every category of personal care products: shampoos, cleansers, personal lubricants, toothpaste, topical pharmaceuticals and moisturizers. Parabens can mimic human hormones and have endrocrine-disrupting capabilities. Although there isn’t sufficient data on the long-term use of low doses of parabens, concentrated quantities of parabens have been linked to cancer, endocrine disruption, reproductive toxicity and more. Although the FDA acknowledges that “estrogenic activity in the body is associated with certain forms of cancer”, they are currently not advising consumers to avoid parabens. Now the question is really up to you; if your personal preference to avoid parabens, there are several other, potentially less harmful preservatives to look for on your labels, like phenoxyethanol, tocopherol and grapefruit seed extract.


Eric Michaels: What about “hypoallergenic” or “dermatologist –tested” products?
Meredith Kerekes: The problem with these claims is that they’re not regulated by a governing body.  According to the FDA, “cosmetic firms are responsible for substantiating the safety of their products and ingredients before marketing.” What most people are unaware of, is that the FDA does not do any premarket testing on products or ingredients. Its regulating function is more reactive. They may pursue enforcement or voluntary recalls against manufacturers to remove products that “represent a hazard, gross deception or are somehow defective.” But they do not regulate claims like “hypoallergenic” or “dermatologist-tested”. Cosmetic companies are free to write these claims on any product they choose, rendering them almost meaningless. Fundamentally, its clever, albeit mildly deceitful, marketing speak.


Eric Michaels: Are natural skin care products better?
Meredith Kerekes: Again, it goes back to your personal preference. There is not as much research on the efficacy of natural skin care ingredients, but that’s largely due to the fact that no one is to profit from their studies. Most cosmetic manufacturers make their money on their proprietary, patented ingredients. You can’t patent pomegranate or green tea, so major manufacturers are not as likely to perform studies proving their effectiveness. There is also the concern of plant allergies, which are common in many people. Natural skin care focuses on plant and mineral actives, which could potentially cause similar irritation and allergies as synthetic products. While the FDA claims these ingredients are safe, there is still more research to be done, especially on long-term use. I personally subscribe to the philosophy of do no harm. If there are other, potentially safer alternatives; why not? The most important thing to remember is to read your labels. I know they’re hidden on the back of the products in 8 point font, but it’s the best way to know what’s actually in the products you’re putting on your body.


Web Site: BlueberriesandBronzer.com

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Want audio version of this eHealth Radio Episode with Meredith Kerekes?


=> Don't Miss Meredith's Conclusion Tip


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Skin Care · Comments

January 6, 2011 @ 9:36 pm

Signs of skin cancer and when to be concerned

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Board Certified Dermatologist & Assistant Professor of Clinical Dermatology in the Department of Dermatology at Columbia University/ New York Presbyterian Hospital - Dr. Monica Halem joins the show. She discusses things to look for in skin cancer and the importance of using sun screen.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Dr. Monica Halem is Assistant Professor of Clinical Dermatology in the Department of Dermatology at Columbia University/ New York Presbyterian Hospital and is a Board Certified Dermatologist who specializes in Mohs micrographic surgery, dermatologic surgery, cosmetic dermatology, and laser surgery.

After graduating with collegiate honors from the University of Michigan, Dr. Halem received her medical degree with research honors distinction from the University of Miami School of Medicine. She then went on to complete her internship and three year residency in General Surgery at the University of Miami. Dr. Halem completed a research fellowship in Cosmetic Dermatology where she conducted several clinical trials advancing the field of cosmetic dermatology. She then completed additional residency training at the Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery at the University of Miami where she was awarded the Dermatology Skin Foundation First Place Research Award and the 2007 Outstanding Dermatologic Surgeon Award. Dr. Halem continued her training and completed a Procedural Dermatology Fellowship at the University of California San Francisco where she focused on skin cancer surgery, cosmetic, and laser surgery.

She then joined faculty at Columbia University where she teaches advanced Dermatologic Surgery to Columbia Dermatology residents. Dr. Halem has published numerous medical articles, book chapters, and conducted several clinical trials in dermatologic and cosmetic surgery. Her mission is to provide the most comprehensive skin cancer therapy and state-of-the-art skin rejuvenation procedures in a compassionate caring manner which is reflected in her clinical practice.

Dr. Halem is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, America College of Mohs Micrographic Surgery, and the American Society for Lasers in Medicine and Surgery.


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Abbreviated Transcript of Interview with Dr. Monica Halem


Eric Michaels: What are some signs of skin cancer and when should I be concerned?
Dr. Halem: There are 3 basic type of skin cancer. There is something called basal cell, squamous cell and melanoma- those are the 3 major points. Now basal cell and squamous cell usually present with an area on your skin or a pimple that doesn't heal or something that continues to bleed periodically - those are some things to be concerned about. These are usually 100% from the sun as the sun is the #1 cause of skin cancer. The other one is something called melanoma. Melanoma often presents a substance that is black or multi-colored. Now these can often arise from previous moles or they can come on their own. So if you have things that don't heal or a pimple that really doesn't go away or anything that looks black on your skin or changes in color you want to see a dermatologist.


Eric Michaels: What is the best type of sunscreen one should use and what does the SPF really mean?
Dr. Halem: So again, the sun is the #1 cause of skin cancer as well as pre-mature skin aging and there are many types of sunscreen out there and you really need to be educated as to what to look out for so one of the things we look for is the SPF and that means the "Sun Protection Factor". And what that does is that it tells you how much filter of the ultra violet radiation is to be expected with that type of sunscreen. So an SPF of 15 filters out about 92% of the ultra violet radiation. I usually recommend to my patients the higher the better especially something used for every day you want to use an SPF of 30 or higher...


Eric Michaels: What are the best skincare regiments and should it change as the seasons change?
Dr. Halem: So that's the one thing everybody should know is when the seasons change you want to adjust your skin care regiment so that it's environmentally in the right category - for example in the summer time you want to use something that's a little bit of a light weight moisturizer and a higher number of sunscreen as opposed to winter time when you want something that's a little bit thicker and more of a creme base instead of lotion based...


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Want the entire audio version of this eHealth Radio Episode? Dr. Monica Halem discusses & answers:

  • Does eating chocolate and drinking milk really cause acne?
  • Special Conclusion Tip - what to not forget on a daily basis!


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Skin Care · Comments

January 3, 2011 @ 4:57 pm

Where Did You Learn How to Shave Men?

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Dr. Brooke Jackson who is a board certified dermatologist and founder/medical director of the Skin Wellness Center of Chicago joined the show. She discusses with Eric Michaels the most common type of cancer, the deadliest type of skin cancer and an interesting trend she sees with darker skin males.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


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Dr. Brooke Jackson is a board certified dermatologist and founder/medical director of the Skin Wellness Center of Chicago. Her specialties include laser therapy, skin cancer treatment and prevention, ethnic skin. As a gifted communicator and highly sought after lecturer, Dr. Jackson’s approach to public education of skin health is providing non-jargon practical medical insight that consumers can understand and appreciate. She became the first African-American dermatologist to be awarded laser fellowship training at Harvard where her interests and research helped to pioneer the uses of lasers in ethnic skin. For more information see SkinWellnessCenter.org or get social and visit the Skin Wellness Center of Chicago's Facebook page.


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Abbreviated Transcript of Interview with Dr. Brooke Jackson


Eric Michaels: What is the most common type of cancer?

Dr. Jackson: Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer. While skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer, sadly it’s one of the most dangerous.


Eric Michaels: What is the deadliest type of skin cancer?

Dr. Jackson: Melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer, causes on average 77 percent of skin cancer deaths a year. Melanoma is a serious threat to everyone and every race. The legendary Bob Marley died of melanoma. There is a skin cancer risk factor for everyone under the sun. I often see sun damage done to patients with darker pigmented since people with darker complexions believe they do not need sun protection. While melanoma is more common in Caucasians, it is deadlier in African-Americans and Hispanics because it’s more likely to go undetected and often diagnosed in its late stages of the disease. Patients with darker complexion skin also suffer from other conditions such as high blood pressure, lupus that require medications that make the skin more sun sensitive.


Eric Michaels: What is an interesting trend you see with darker skin males?

Dr. Jackson: Did you know a man will shave on average 20,000 times in his life? Every time you put a sharp razor to your skin there is a chance of risk. Men with darker skin also have different hair follicle textures which leads them more at risk for (PFB) pseudofolliculitis barbae commonly known as razor bumps—Due to curly nature of hair, shaving causes sharp edge and hair re-enters skin causing inflammatory reaction and hair bump. Other issues are scars – from picking and trying to free ingrown hairs, along with discoloration of beard area. Brown skin discolors with irritation. All men are at risk for razor burn on sensitive facial skin with the use of irritation products on skin such as alcohol.


Eric Michaels: What are some proper shaving techniques to avoid these issues?

Dr. Jackson: Pre-shave preparation of  your skin.  At least once or twice a day use a baby’s ( soft bristle) toothbrush in circular motion to dislodge any ingrown hairs. Pre-shave  exfoliation. At least once or twice a week men need to exfoliate. Do not do this just prior to shaving. This can be inexpensive with items available at the drugstore from companies like Aveeno and Dove cloths. Exfoliating removes dead skin and softens it. Shave less frequently. Use clipper since this will not give you such a close shave. Use chemical depilatories such as Magic shave. Thioglycolate melts hair and allows you to scrape it off. However, men with sensitive skin should not due this since it involves a chemical and can cause irritation. Consider a wet shave: Cleanse skin with a gentle cleanser. Soften and hydrate beard hair prior to shaving. Apply a warm compress to the beard-area for 3-5 minutes prior to shaving, this allows hairs to stand up on skin. Use an non-irritating cream to lubricate face. Again, you can find items at your local drugstore from Aveeno with vanicream. Use a Gillette Mach 3 allows blade to glide over skin, which is flexible for contours of face. Always remember to shave with grain of hair and do not stretch skin. Its also important to use the one handed method to shave. Shaving against grain can push hair back into skin causing bump. Rinse blade frequently to unclog blade. It's critical to soothe the skin afterward. Consider using a hydrating serum or a hydrapeptide gel. Avoid alcohol containing products that can be too drying and cause irritation. Last but not least but sure to maintain. Use the topical glycolic or kojilac cream. These products can soften the skin and decrease hyperpigmentation on dark skin especially on days not shaving.


Eric Michaels: What are some solutions for continued trouble skin that a dermatologist can provide?

Dr. Jackson: A certified dermatologist and someone trained can provide laser hair removal.  The collar area is the most common area for problems. Laser hair removal reduces density of hair, which will lead to the need to shave less often and ultimately reduce irritation. Laser hair removal is very safe for dark skin. This procedure is not as effective for white or gray hair on lighter skin.  A certified dermatologist can also provide a chemical peel that will help with inflammation and discoloration found in darker skin. For a certified dermatologist in your area, visit the American Academy of Dermatology at www.aad.org.


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Want the entire audio version of this eHealth Radio Episode? Dr. Brooke Jackson leaves a special tip in conclusion:


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Skin Care · Comments

December 30, 2010 @ 2:42 pm

The Secret to Health in Every Department

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Health Expert Lorne Caplan joined the show. Lorbe is a Health Expert, Speaker, Author and Chief Scientific Officer. he touches on a wode variety of topics leading to one foundational secret to good overall health - listen in.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Lorne Caplan has over fifteen years of expertise developing, sourcing, researching and training staff and clients about constituent ingredients, both natural and synthetic while creating product lines and specific programs for products, services and devices in the fragrance, anti-aging skincare, wellness, aesthetics (cosmetics), and gift (scented candles) industries. Lorne has built, managed and developed these product and service lines as a former owner and operator of the 14,000 square foot Danielle Spa/ Aevium Institute and Radiance Med Spas, as well as when advising clients that included SpaMedicus, Pure Laser, American Leisure, Cornelia Spa, individuals and physicians. Lorne has written and presented training and educational forums on aphrodisiacs (yes, they do exist), sensuality, romance, passion and intimacy as relates to human relationships and pheromone research.

Along with his current role as Director of Product  Development at Pheromone products company Victor Goth, LLC, an Master & Mistress, Lorne successfully advised, funded and invested in companies within the cosmeceutical, nutraceutical, biotech and life sciences sectors. As a member of the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine and founder of the Womens Total Health and Wellness Conference and Exhibit, Lorne maintains and often benefits from his experiences within the fields of womens health and sexual health.

Lorne has been frequently quoted and published in industry periodicals such as Self Magazine, Spa 20/20, Spa Management, Medical Spa Management, Spa Canada, Inside Cosmeceuticals and is a regular speaker on subjects related to , fragrance / olfaction, relationship and sexual health, integrative therapies, age-management and the aesthetics industry at conferences such as The everything to do With Sex Show, Exotic Erotica, Face & Body, Medical Spa & Aesthetics Conference, Society for Plastic Surgery Skin Care Specialists, Grayson Natural and Organic Personal Care Conference, The International Anti-aging Show and The American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine. Lorne received his combined degree in history and political science at McGill University in Montreal and his MBA at The Ivey School of Management in London, Canada. He is currently completing his Naturopathic Doctorate from Clayton College and spreads his optimal health and life message through his blog at Anti-AgingBeauty.com and AgeMedica, LLC.


Conference Topics


Romance, passion and intimacy in an age devoid of courtship
Physiological influences of scent
Topical Hormone Therapy
Cosmetic Peptides
Medical Spa Marketing
Training and Education for Medical Spas
Product Development
Developing A Medical Spa for Physicians and Non-Physicians
Setting Up an Anti-aging Wellness Center


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Transcript of Interview with Lorne Caplan


Eric Michaels: Beyond the myriad of typical sexual enhancement products, some effective some not, what is the single most important aspect of maintaining and building sexual health?


Lorne Caplan: As you know, we are bombarded daily by on-line spam and traditional media that offer numerous products to enhance our sexual performance and prowess, with some 95% not having any actives that would be effective while perhaps 5% offering some benefit.

By taking these products we expect to immediately improve our romance quotient, but it is a much more complex issue than simply taking a pill. In fact, if we added something as simple as scent to our daily regimen, we would find that our attitude and confidence level would improve, which in turn increases the feel good hormones that are secreted by our brain and other glands. These hormones are typically referred to as “feel good hormones” such as dopamine, vasopressin and seratonin. I often refer to these as addiction hormones because they are similar to those that are affected by those that are addicted to drugs. We want more of that feeling, so we tend to do what we can to get it. That is why being “in-love” is an addiction. It changes our feel good hormone balance and therefore, it changes how we feel. That can be good, but also difficult because we lose some control over how we think and act.

Keeping that in mind, how our new found feeling will affect the way we behave, we can obtain key aspects of a healthy sexuality by adding these aphrodisiacs and pheromones to our daily regimen. By improving our confidence, self-esteem and attitude, our whole physical body and underlying health will improve. Now certainly we are aware that our blood pressure and circulatory system are important aspects to a healthy sexuality, just as numerous pharmaceutical companies tell us everyday, but we can derive these benefits from scent and fragrance when we build in the powerful aspects of aphrodisiacs and pheromones because they directly affect our overall endocrine system. When we feel good, we actually can change our physical health which is absolutely necessary to having great sex and supporting our healthy sexuality.


Eric Michaels: Are there any secrets or knowledge that isn't widely known about sexual health and how to improve it?


Lorne Caplan: Certainly, there are a number of lesser known aspects of what we can do to improve our sexual health as opposed to simply popping a pill or thinking that intercourse is the answer. Intimacy is far more than simply how often we have sex. It is simply touching hands or looking at your partner. Those secrets include the use of aphrodisiacs in your daily life. Something as simple as cutting fresh basil and inhaling the scent will do wonders for your disposition. If you include these scent solutions to your daily routine, then you will notice improvement in a variety of aspects in your daily life, from your mood, to your physical health related to your underlying hormone and endocrine balance and that is what we should all be striving for. After-all, just having your longevity, size or otherwise improved won’t ultimately benefit your sexual health. It is far more involved than simply that. Keeping in mind that the brain is ultimately the largest sex organ because it has to be involved in the process of intimacy, we as sophisticated mammals have to understand that we must feel good to perform better at anything, whether it is sexuality or business. If we don’t take care of our bodies, beyond adding sexual hormone supporting scents, then the effects will not be systemic, or complete and that is something we should all strive for. It is the balance and whole body approach that will give us the necessary stamina, quality of intimacy and understanding of what builds a truly excellent romance quotient beyond simply health of your sex life. People tend to misunderstand that (in many mens cases) the number of times we have sex is what dictates our health, when in fact that is the farthest thing from the truth.

We, as humans, need a variety of stimuli to satisfy our sexual health and the secrets lie in supporting those aspects that aren’t simply attached to the physical touch, but our other senses. That is why scent is so powerful. If we bring-in pheromones and aphrodisiacs, we will find a number of perceptions and feelings affected that we otherwise wouldn’t have considered, adding a positive level of complexity and nourishing our relationships, both sexually and alternatively with family, our business associates and others. It isn’t complicated, rather it can be and should be quite simple. That is another secret to healthy sexuality. Keep it simple, breaking down the many outside influences like work, children, money and many more intrusions that make  our sexual health more difficult to maintain and improve because we aren’t letting the more subtle and beneficial aspects seep into our lives.


Eric Michaels: Since people are very complex, is it reasonable to expect a healthy sex life? What are the hurdles we would have to overcome as men and women and are there any major differences?


Lorne Caplan: Well, that is a difficult but important question and yes, we as humans are indeed very complex, since we don’t get attracted by one sense alone. We are impacted by sight, scent, touch and all of the senses not to mention the competing noise around us in our daily lives. It is easy to get lost and lose important aspects of our relationships. We see this all the time with the breakdown in marriages and relationships. Our sexual experiences are affected not by one aspect alone and it is absolutely true that men and women are indeed very differently. The endocrine systems are very different with women having substantially more estrogen and progesterone than men and it does affect the way women respond and think, just as it affects mens responses. While women might be thinking about family, work, the house or numerous other things, men will have their “empty-box” open and be able to focus only on one thing. This is a scientific fact. Our emotions are different and therefore our needs are as well. While men might be thinking about simply how they will have sex with a woman, she may well be thinking about numerous aspects of the relationship, the physical appearance, etc… Men are able to and are often hated for, being able to think about one thing only and not be affected by so many competing aspects of the daily grind as women do.

As complex mammals, we also process information from a variety of resources. That is why we might “see” someone and be attracted to them from across the room.  Our eyes tell us that we might like their hair, their build, or some other physical attribute. The shallow sense if you will. While we can’t smell that person from a distance, we absolutely won’t like someone that we don’t like the smell of. So if you are married or in a relationship today, I can assure you that you like that persons scent, otherwise you wouldn’t be with them. That is how powerful the sense of smell is. It is a deal breaker if that person doesn’t smell well. So if that person from across the room looks great but comes over and smell horribly to you, then there won’t be a relationship in the making. It is, though, perfectly reasonable to expect a healthy sex life, since what we have to do is break it down to it’s more basic elements. Focus on the important and supportive aspects of healthy sexuality. Don’t let all the intrusions impact you. Communicate with your mate or a new prospective partner. Look into their eyes as I mentioned before. Pay attention to what they are saying (men especially). Don’t worry about all the details, the clothes, the fragrance, the restaurant, etc… but make an effort to understand and relate to the important things, the little things and you will find that as confidence builds, so too will your ability to engage in that physical relationship that is often lost in the mix. Essentially, keeping it simple, that is the major hurdle and it is greater for women, because of the way their hormones are configured, versus men and their “empty-drawer”. For men, their role would be in helping the women keep the noise from intruding. Keep it basic, simple and supportive and you will reap the benefits of a healthy sexuality, intimacy, romance an passion that will evolve from the efforts, big and small, that are made.


Eric Michaels: Can hair loss be reversed and are there any treatments that truly work now and what will be effective in the future?


Lorne Caplan: People will often ask me how this relates to passion, intimacy and healthy sexuality and as I mentioned before, the endocrine system and our feel good hormones are directly related to scent and the addition of substantial feel good scents within aphrodisiacs and pheromones that drive the production of those crack hormones or addition hormones. This is true too, for our hair and follicle health, since we do need to have balance and a healthy psychology to impact our physical health. If we don’t eat or exercise, we won’t support our physical bodies necessary nourishment and our scalp, just like our skin will suffer. After all, the scalp environment is skin and if your skin isn’t healthy from a poor diet, no exercise, etc… then you can be sure the follicles will also suffer. Now certainly, there are hormone derivatives like DHT that block up the follicles and prevent nourishment from reaching the follicle, just as we notice how much better our hair and nails grow in the sun. However, beyond the various peptide and stem-cell research that is promised to work within the next few decades to grow our hair back, we do have the ability to get the same benefits from our sun without the side affects of radiation. The technology is called low light laser therapy (LLLT) along with the necessary topical enzymes to clean the scalp and ingredients like wheat germ extract, neem and emu oil (which can be very greasy, but when applied in small amounts has shown to grow hair back) to help stimulate growth from the surface. Keep in mind that the skin is after-all a barrier and large molecule items cannot penetrate it or we’d all be dead from the toxins in our environment. Some items do have the ability to stimulate the health of our follicles as they don’t die easily. They atrophy over time, get clogged by dirt and DHT and then die out. We can, today, influence the health of our follicles and scalp health and the LLLT in turn does indeed help restore our follicles to the growth phase of hair generation, without the side affects of radiation. Of course, blood circulation is necessary to bring the nutrients to our scalp (an extremity) which is not different from our needs for a healthy blood flow for sexual health. I can discuss more commonalities, but if you can see the links with skin health, circulatory system improvement, proper nutrition, you’ll note the necessary elements to gain a healthy scalp as well as sexuality.


Eric Michaels: Is anti-aging of skin obtainable today and do skincare products really work?


Lorne Caplan: As I mentioned before, skin is a barrier and generally, products in topicals don’t penetrate the skin, otherwise it would be characterized as a drug. Some companies like Allergan and the large cosmetics entities like L’Oreal and Estee Lauder would have you believe that their newest peptides, items derived from growing cells in a lab or DNA products would actually change the structure and performance of the skin cell. This is for the most part false as you would need the necessary components that I mentioned before to impact the health of your skin as well as sexuality and scalp for hair growth.

While topical skincare products can have an impact on your anti-aging appearance, it is usually derived from two ingredient categories, the first being a surfactant which covers the skin to lock in moisture. What this does is give you the appearance of plumper, healthier looking skin and yes, you’ll look younger, but it is only a temporary fix along with a humectant that draws moisture to the skin, again hydrating the skin to make it look plumper, healthier and more youthful. I don’t mean to say that all topicals (butters, creams, lotions,serums or other forms) only give you a temporary none cellular change. Some products do contain enough of an active ingredient to make changes in the skin such as hyaluronic acid, collegen and vitamin A in it’s active form. Again, they have to be configured right in order to have an impact but if you don’t exercise, eat right or have a digestive system that absorbs and metabolizes the necessary ingredients to allow your skin to be supported in it’s daily effort to regenerate itself (this is true for the necessary hormones as well, which drop off significantly as we age), than no matter how much stuff we put on our skin, it won’t improve the long term appearance. That is key here, the digestive health of the individual, which relates to the necessary balance of our endocrine system and over all balance of our bodies. Only then will we see a true anti-aging benefit without the use of lasers, injections and other skin abrasive techniques.


Contacts & Information:


Phone: (917) 881-5613


Office: (914) 355-4532


Web Site: MasterMistress.com


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Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Hair Loss Prevention, Skin Care, Sexual Health · Comments

December 29, 2010 @ 2:54 pm

How to Keep Our Hands & Feet Moist in the Winter

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Co-founder of Indie Beauty brand, Three Custom Color Specialists - Trae Bodge joined the show to discuss caring for winter skin.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


In addition to being the co-founder of indie color cosmetic brand, Three Custom Color Specialists, Trae has recently embarked on a new career as a beauty & lifestyle journalist for mainstreet.com, makeup artist, author and product development consultant. She loves sharing beauty & lifestyle tips, product reco's, gift ideas and deals with her readers. She loves this new era in her professional life!


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Abbreviated Transcript of Interview with Trae Bodge


Eric Michaels: Why does our skin feel so dry in the winter?
Trae Bodge: The cold air really drys out the skin, as does the heat in our homes, cars and offices.


Eric Michaels: How should you adjust your skin care routine in the dry, winter months?
Trae Bodge: If you are using a cleanser that foams at all, change to a creamy, non foaming cleanser.  You will also need more moisture - if you really like the moisturizers you are using, you can can supplement then with a serum, which will provide moisture and help your moisturizers work more effectively.  Otherwise, you can use richer moisturizers in winter and then switch back to lighter ones in the warmer months.


Eric Michaels: What if a person has oily breakout-prone skin, but is feeling dry in areas?  How should they adjust their skin care routine?
Trae Bodge: Use a slightly less foaming cleanser and use a serum just where there are experiencing dryness.


Eric Michaels: What about the skin on our bodies?
Trae Bodge: Our body skin will also suffer in the winter months.  I would recommend exfoliating a few times a week - I find that the oily, sugar scrubs are the most effective.  Also, use rich creams or oils after bathing.


Eric Michaels: What about our hands and feet?  How do we keep them moist in winter?
Trae Bodge: A great trick is to apply a rich cream or balm on hands and feet before we put our gloves and socks on. The mild perspiration will create a "spa-like" effect and really allow the moisture to penetrate into those trouble areas.


Contacts & Information:


Facebook: TrueTrae
Twitter: @TrueTrae


Journalist: MainStreet.com


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Don't Miss Trae Bodge's Conclusion Tip.


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Skin Care · Comments

December 29, 2010 @ 12:20 pm

The Skin Takes a Beating in the Winter

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Cosmetic chemist and research executive Ron Robinson. He is also a resident beauty expert for Allure Magazine nd joins the show to discuss how to care for your skin during the winter season.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


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Ron Robinson has developed beauty products for Clinique, Estee Lauder, Revlon, Avon and Lancome. He has been featured in Womens Wear Daily, Self Magazine, Womens Health Magazine, Los Angeles Times and CBS News. He is also a resident beauty expert for Allure Magazine. Ron is the founder of the #1 beauty community on Facebook called BeautyStat.com with over 30,000 highly engaged and influential beauty consumers.


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Transcript of Interview with Ron Robinson


Eric Michaels: It seems the texture of my skin changes during the winter, What is that?

Ron Robinson: There’s no question: the skin takes a beating in the winter. It gets dehydrated and thereby makes you loose suppleness and elasticity. This issue is exacerbated by the fact that we spend a lot of time indoors where the air is very dry.


Eric Michaels: What does my skin seem to be more sensitive during this time of year?

Ron Robinson: During the winter, sensitive skin is particularly vulnerable to loss of its natural barrier protection. It can become itchy and red quite frequently.


Eric Michaels: What about acne-prone skin and large pores?

Ron Robinson: If you are concerned about acne, large pores or rough texture, remember that your skin's natural exfoliation cycle slows down during colder months, leading to clogged pores and breakouts. So regular exfoliation using a facial scrub is important during this time of year.


Eric Michaels: Why is sunscreen so important during the winter? I thought it to be more crucial during the beach season. Ron Robinson: Yes, Sunscreen is important year round.  The sun's rays reflect off the snow and ice and can become as intense as in the summer months.  So wear sunscreen everyday.


Eric Michaels: As an expert, what would you suggest as the 5 essential rules to follow during the winter season? Ron Robinson: Actually, I have 6 recommendations:

  • 1) Moisturize daily.  Apply up to two to three times a day as needed.
  • 2) Exfoliate at least once a week.  Be gentle especially if you have sensitive skin.
  • 3) Keep showers short and warm. Long, hot showers strip the natural oils from you skin. You should spend no more than ten minutes in the shower.
  • 4) Apply SPF 15 (at least) sunscreen everyday.
  • 5) Consider using a humidifier in your home.  Indoor heaters can reduce the humidity to less than ten percent.  To counter this, place a humidifier in the room in which you spend the most time.
  • 6) Stay hydrated.  Drinking adequate amounts of water benefits your overall health and helps hydrate your skin from within.


Eric Michaels: One last question: With so many products on the market, it can get very confusing what is right for the consumer to choose from, how do we know what is the right product for ones skin type? Ron Robinson: This is a common concern. Me and my team have found a great way to diagnose your skin and it's FREE. It's called Crystalize. Crystalize is an innovative skin imaging service that provides better knowledge about your unique skin, enabling you to make smarter choices about products to use, and can help you to achieve more beautiful skin.  You can now visit a Duane Reade Look Boutique for your complementary, objective Crystalize consultation, and upload your own skin secret by January 24th for a chance to win a $200 personalized skincare regimen. Or visit Crystalize.com/skinsecrets.

Contact & Information:

Web Site: BeautyStat.com


Facebook: Facebook.com/BeautyStat


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Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Skin Care · Comments

December 27, 2010 @ 7:20 pm

Changes That Need to Happen in the Beauty Industry

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Becky Sturm, CEO/Founder of StormSister Spatique, an online retailer of Lotions, Potions and Serums for hair, skin, nails & body joins the show. She tells Eric what she would change about the beauty industry,  inexpensive skincare tips for problematic skin and more great information.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Having spent 26 years in all aspects of the salon and spa and boutique business, as well as growing up in her grandmothers' salon has given Becky Sturm a well-rounded perspective of her industry. Her experience performing haircare, skincare and nailcare service as well as a vast knowledge of salon and spa beauty/grooming products has led to her recent foray into product development. The beauty industry is embroiled in much controversy about product ingredients, self-regulation and improper labeling as to what is considered "natural" and "organic". These issues are a major concern for Becky and her clientele and she will be addressing them with her own brand that will launch in the spring of 2011.


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Transcript of Interview with Becky Sturm


Eric Michaels: If I could change anything about the beauty industry, what would it be?


Becky Sturm: That beauty companies did more to clean up their ingredient lists. There are many controversial ingredients that do not need to be in personal grooming/beauty products. We should start by adopting the European standard.


Eric Michaels: What are some inexpensive skincare tips for problem skin?
Becky Sturm: It is imperative that problematic skin be cleansed morning and evening.  Skipping one of the daily cleanings perpetuates the problem. Wipe down phones (office, cell, landlines) daily, with a wet wipe. There is a lot of bacteria on phones. Change your pillowcase at least once per week. More often if possible. Our faces spend a lot of time on a pillow. That is a huge breeding ground for bacteria.


Eric Michaels: How often should hair be shampooed?
Becky Sturm: No more than once or twice per week. Ideally, no more than once per week. Slowly work up to this by rinsing on the days you would usually shampoo. Rub scalp as if shampooing, rinse thoroughly, add a bit of conditioner to the ends if needed and then 1/2 of the styling/grooming products used on the previous wash/rinse day. Work slowly up to this goal. You will save a lot of money on product/salon services and hair and scalp health will be improved. This regimen is especially helpful to those with curly/wavy hair.


Eric Michaels: How often should body exfoliants be used?
Becky Sturm: Two to three times a week is ideal. Not every day. Exfoliating is important for skin and body health. The face should not be exfoliated more than once or twice per week since facial skin is much thinner than the skin on our bodies. Too much exfoliation can actually cause skin problems through small abrasions.


Eric Michaels: Can any grooming products do double duty?
Becky Sturm: Your shampoo can certainly be used as a shower gel. Leave-in conditioners make great body moisturizers and work well as anti-static remedies. Shea butter is great as an all over moisturizer, cuticle balm, and hair balm for short curly hair.


Conclusion Tip: Add some pure shea butter to your winter skincare regimen by working a small amount into clean hands and patting gently over moisturizer. This seals in the healing/hydrating properties of your moisturizer and gives an added protection to skin in the winter months. This tips works for face and body.


Web Site: StormSisterSpatique.com


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Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Skin Care · Comments

December 27, 2010 @ 6:08 pm

The #1 Nutrient That We Need For Optimal Skin Health

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Professional Nutritionist Shawn Stevenson joined the show. Shawn is a Professional Nutritionist specializing in biochemistry and kinesiological science, as well as advanced treatment for acute and chronic disorders. He is the author of several books including The Key to Quantum Health and The Fat Loss Code. He discusses what is the best topical treatment for healthy skin, what are some complimentary practices that people can do to bring a healthy glow and youthfulness to their skin, and what is the #1 nutrient that we need for optimal skin health...


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Shawn Stevenson holds a Bachelors of Science degree from The University of Missouri – St. Louis, and he is the founder of the Advanced Integrative Health Alliance. Over nearly a decade of research, Shawn’s work has touched the lives of thousands of people in his private practice, programs, and live events.  Shawn’s greatest gift has been providing a tremendous array of valuable strategies, insights, techniques, tools for healing, and proven methods for radically transforming the health and beauty of the human body.


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Partial Transcript of Interview with Shawn Stevenson


Eric Michaels: What is the #1 nutrient that we need for optimal skin health?

Shawn Stevenson: This is going to come as a surprise to many people, but the #1 thing we need for our skin health is actually saturated fat. Saturated fat is actually the basis of our entire nervous system and it may also come as a surprise for people to know that our skin is the outermost part of our nervous system which is directly extended from our brain when we are developed and with this being said, saturated fat is incredibly important. In recent media over the last few years, saturated fat were given a bad name just because of a misunderstanding. To keep it very simple, saturated fat is a chemical make up which the carbon atoms are saturated with hydrogen atoms and hydrogen means hydration which is actually a very very good thing. So the problems come in when the saturated fats become oxidized which it take extremely high heat to make good healthy saturated fat oxidized...


Eric Michaels: Are there any other important factors that influence the health of the skin?

Shawn Stevenson: Absolutely! There definitely are. The main would be the liver and the liver function of the person. Your liver has a direct influence over the nervous system. The other one would be the emphatic system. Your skin is actually your body's most largest organ and the lymphatic system is sort of like the body's sewage system, it helps to flush out a lot of toxins out through your skin...


Eric Michaels: What are the common hidden allergens that are contributing to breakouts?

Shawn Stevenson: The number one thing would definitely be the opposite of what we want the saturated fat it would be oxidized and rancid oils. That is the #1 thing that is causing the break outs. That would be things like cooked oils, things like olive oil, olive oil is a very great thing even for your skin, but when you cook it, because we want it extra virgin and unheated but we cook with it because we were programmed with the idea it's ok - you can cook with it to a certain degree but it is heat sensitive...


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Want the entire audio version of this eHealth Radio Episode?
Shawn Stevenson discusses & answers:

  • What are some complimentary practices that people can do to bring a healthy glow and youthfulness to their skin?
  • What is the best topical treatment for healthy skin?
  • Conclusion Tip...


Contact Information:


Web Site: TheSSModel.com


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Skin Care · Comments

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