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December 29, 2010 @ 7:50 am

Are You Involved in Cyber-Sex?

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Clinical Psychologist, Speaker, Author, Media coach and Hypnotherapist Dr. Janet Hall joins the show from Melbourne, Australia. She has written 8 books and recorded 34 CDs. She helps people superboost their confidence and get fantastic results.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.

Dr. Janet Hall is the author of eight books on family and relationship issues including “Sex-Wise Teens” and “Sex-life Solutions”. Jan is featured regularly on the television program “Sex Life” as their female sex therapist/advisor. Her 19 CDS in the Sensational Sex Series frankly and informatively discuss sexual issues ranging from sex therapy with hypnosis, to advice on creating and sharing sexual fantasies, and strategies for sparking up your sex-life.

Dr. Jan is consistently in demand from the media for comment on a variety of current issues.


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Transcript of Interview with Dr. Janet Hall


Eric Michaels: Why do men make the women attend sex therapy?

Dr. Hall: The most common problem for women is that they are not “turning onto” sex. They're just not interested. Because sex is more important to men usually than it is to women, there are a group of men who send their women in for therapy and asks the therapist -'can you fix my woman?' These men hope that I can give them a magic pill which will get their women interested in sex. (Alas, there is no such magic in a pill – the woman has to turn on the main switch inside her mind and body to find sexual inspiration.)


Eric Michaels: Describe the main difference between the way men view sex vs. the way women do?

Dr. Hall: Men tend to be visual and they like a lot to do with what they are seeing to be stimulated during sex – a woman wearing flimsy underwear is more enticing than a naked woman.
Women like to feel that affection has been shown to them and they like to be touched gently. Put very simply: Men want women to dress up in lingerie and women want to be given roses and to be told that they're beautiful.


Eric Michaels: What is the biggest misconception that men vs women have about sex?

Dr. Hall: Men are often fixated on intercourse as being the 'big bang' they call it, and that sex should end up in orgasms for both. Actually, women often buy into that “big bang” belief as well -but the main belief that causes sexual issues which women buy into is that “as long as you're being a good woman to your partner, it doesn't matter if you don't have sex. If you're a good woman-a good mother, a good partner and a good wife -you can get away with not having sex”.


Eric Michaels: What are your views about cyber sex?

Dr. Hall: If someone is involved with someone and engages in cyber sex or views sex on the web, it can only work as long as you're sharing it with your partner. If it's hidden, it's cheating. So if you're hiding, it's cheating. 
Web based sex usually ends up causing damage to a couple's sex life.


Eric Michaels: What's the most unique sexual problem you've seen a client about?

Dr. Hall: I think that women who have Vaginismus are the most unique (that is, a small but very deserving group of women) because that's something so many people are not aware of except the sufferers. Vaginismus is like anxiety (even a “panic attack”) of the vagina so that nothing can penetrate the vagina. The woman may have been married for several years and never had anything penetrate her vagina, though she can be sexually active, enjoying orgasms and intimacy. 
There's many possible reasons for Vaginismus. For instance, if the girl’s mother has been very negative about sex and warns that -'good girls wouldn't do that.' It can also result from hearing about other women complain about pain. It can just happen to the worrying types, you know people who worry about anything that's new and strange. It can also be caused by a physical problem – perhaps recurrent Thrush which causes severe pain. The vaginal sphincter and internal muscles seize up. We don't know how common it is because women are only starting to come for therapy more often with it now and it has been badly diagnosed in the past.


Eric Michaels: What happens when sex goes bad in a relationship. Can you get it back?

Dr. Hall: 
We need to clear up any upsets that might have happened to in past and come to
terms with them. Then we have to agree on what's going to happen in the
future. If he wants to swing by the chandeliers and you want to do it with
the lights out, it's never going to be good. You have to make agreements
about what you expect and what you will do and won't do.
That's where it's good to get a mediator, sometimes a family counselor but
maybe a sex therapist is best.


Contact & Information:


Web Site: sex-therapy.com.au


Phone: Melboure, Australia - +61-3-94193010


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Don't Miss Dr. Janet's Conclusion Tip.


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Relationships, Sexual Health · Comments

December 27, 2010 @ 7:23 am

What exactly are bio-identical hormones?

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Natural Health Practitioner specializing in natural anti-aging and sexual issues James Occhiogrosso joins the show. He discusses bio-identical hormones, progesterone as being protective against cancer and strokes...


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


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James Occhiogrosso is a Natural Health Practitioner specializing in natural anti-aging and other male and female health issues and author of the book "Your Prostate, Your Libido, Your Life." He maintains an active practice helping both men and women overcome hormonal and sexual issues associated with aging, including erectile dysfunction, lack of libido, PMS and menopausal problems, and often acts as an advisor for men with prostate cancer whose doctors recommend a "watchful waiting" or “active surveillance” approach. Salivary home hormone test kits as well as bio-identical hormone creams are available at his website HealthNaturallyToday.com, via phone at 239-498-1547, or via email to DrJim@HealthNaturallyToday.com. You can also sign up for his free “Health Naturally” newsletter on his website.


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Transcript of Interview with Dr. Jim Occhiogrosso


Eric Michaels: In the recent past, appearances by Suzanne Somers and other celebrities have sparked a lot of interest in bio-identical hormone replacement for anti-aging, but conventional medical practitioners dispute its safety. What exactly are bio-identical hormones? And, are they safe?


Dr. Occhiogrosso: The term “bio-identical” refers to substances that are identical to those produced by the human body.  Prescription hormone replacement therapy is produced either synthetically or from animals and is not bio-identical.  The human body has difficulty recognizing non bio-identical substances hence they create problems.  This is one of the reasons pharmaceutical drugs have more side effects than natural substances.  For example: red yeast rice can lower cholesterol levels nearly as effectively as prescription cholesterol lowering drugs.  But, red yeast rice has mild side effects when compared to the prescription drugs.

Prescription hormone replacement therapy (HRT) consists of synthetic estrogens and synthetic progesterone, otherwise known as progestin.  These artificial estrogens have been implicated in the development of breast and other cancers, and synthetic progestin has been linked to an increased risk of a  stroke.  The Women’s Health Initiative study—which was supposed to prove the benefits of prescription hormone replacement therapy for women—was terminated early due to the increased risk of breast cancer and stroke in the study participants.

Bio-identical hormones, on the other hand, have not been linked to any of these problems. In fact, according to Dr. John R. Lee, M.D., bio-identical progesterone is somewhat protective against both stroke and cancer.


Eric Michaels: You mentioned progesterone as being protective against cancer and stroke, what about estrogen?


Dr. Occhiogrosso: When we talk about estrogen, you must realize that there are several different types of estrogenic hormones.  The three most prominent are Estradiol, Estrone, and Estriol.  Estradiol is the strongest and most active and the one that is most likely to cause problems, and estriol is the weakest and least likely to cause problems.  Estradiol is the most prominent estrogen in prescription HRT and appears to be the most dangerous.

When women are experiencing symptoms of menopause like hot flashes, night sweats, and/or PMS, it is usually not needed to replace estrogen.  The exceptions are women who have had their ovaries removed and menopausal women experiencing severe vaginal dryness.  Most other symptoms can be relieved with a little bio-identical progesterone cream applied daily.

When bio-identical progesterone does not do the job, a small amount of estriol cream, which is very safe, is quite effective.  Generally, most women (and men) have too much estrogen in their body because of poor diets and synthetic estrogens that find their way into our bodies through the environment.  Men, particularly older men, usually have estrogen levels that are too high, so they should not use estrogen in any form.


Eric Michaels: Can men use bio-identical hormone replacement too?


Dr. Occhiogrosso: Certainly!  Normal aging in both men and women causes certain hormone levels to drop, particularly testosterone in men and estrogen in women.  Also, aging causes both sexes to have lower levels of progesterone and DHEA.  These reduced levels cause symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats and low libido in both men and women, and are associated with sexual dysfunction in both sexes.  Restoring more youthful hormone levels can often eliminate these problems.  In addition, both progesterone and testosterone can help offset the negative effects of estrogen.


Eric Michaels: Men always worry about testosterone, but I have heard that raising testosterone levels can cause men to develop prostate cancer or women to develop muscles or grow facial hair.  Is this really true?


Dr. Occhiogrosso: According to the latest research, a healthy man that is free of prostate cancer does not increase his risk of developing it by enhancing his testosterone level—as long as he keeps it within the normal biological range. When testosterone levels drop due to aging, a man can experience depression, loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, and in extreme cases, osteoporosis or muscle wasting.  Restoring a man’s testosterone level to its biological norm can have a major impact on his quality of life.  As far as women, they also need correct testosterone levels to feel well and maintain good health.  As long as a women keeps her testosterone level within normal limits, there is little risk of any side effects — except, of course — increased libido.


Eric Michaels: So how does one know which hormones to take, and how much of them to use?


Dr. Occhiogrosso: Well, the best way is to use a simple home saliva test (like the ones on my website) prior to starting any hormone replacement therapy to measure your levels.  Then, based on a professional evaluation of the results, you can balance your levels as needed.  After about two to three months or so, you can re-measure to insure that you are on the right path.  The important thing with hormones for both men and women is to achieve normal balance — more is not better!  In fact, using more than is needed can be detrimental.

Many bio-identical hormones like DHEA, estriol and progesterone are available over-the-counter without a prescription, but bio-identical testosterone can only be obtained by prescription from a compounding pharmacy.  This is because testosterone has a history of abuse by the “muscle building” crowd.  And overusing testosterone can cause serious health problems.  However, herbal testosterone creams designed specifically for men and women provide the raw ingredients to help your body produce more testosterone.   I use several of them in my practice.  They are very safe and I have found them to be very effective.  Both men and women with low libido — and men with erectile dysfunction can use them to improve their sexual functioning.


Conclusion Tip: The first is to get your hormones tested and evaluated by a professional before starting any therapy. This is imperative!  Without testing, you won’t know which hormones or how much of them to use and a professional can help evaluate your results.  Second, don’t try to raise your hormone levels beyond the biological normal values.  This can be very counterproductive!


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Want the entire audio version of this eHealth Radio Episode?


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your convenient guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Health, Performance, ED, Sexual Health · Comments

December 17, 2010 @ 12:24 pm

Most Men Feel That It Is Psychological

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Dr. Michael A. Werner a urologist in New York who specializes in male sexual dysfunction and infertility joins the show. He discusses ED, and its most common treatments and more.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Michael A. Werner, M.D. is a board-certified urologist who received his specialized fellowship training in male infertility and sexual dysfunction at Boston University Medical Center. His private practice in New York City, Westchester and Fairfield, CT are limited to his two areas of specialization: male infertility and male and female sexual dysfunction. In addition to his own private practice, Dr. Werner serves as the Medical Director of the Medical Center for Female Sexuality. He lectures and writes extensively on these topics in medical journals and books.

Dr. Werner is also the founder and medical director of M.A.Z.E. Labs, a semen analysis lab where semen is analyzed and often prepared for insemination or stored.  He is also the founder and clinical director of M.A.Z.E. Cord Blood Laboratories, a company that stores umbilical cord blood stem cells.

Dr. Werner completed his Urology residency at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan.  He performed his surgical residency at Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan and completed his internship at St. Luke’s Hospital in New York City.  He earned his medical degree at the University of California at San Francisco. He graduated cum laude with a degree is in Biology from Harvard College where he received the John Harvard and Detur Awards for academic achievement.


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Partial Transcript of Interview with Dr. Michael Werner


Eric Michaels: Is there a particular or common age range in men where they begin to experience ED issues?

Dr. Werner: Most men feel that it is psychological and they worry that it is something in their head. For most men that are over thirty-five, 90% of the time it is a physical problem. If it's going to be physical, 90% of the time it is a circulation problem, having a hard time getting the blood into the penis and having a hard time holding on to it. The main risk factors are the same risk factors for men having a heartache or a stroke. For example, high blood pressure or diabetes or high cholesterol or smoking. So we see that a lof of these men really have vascular issues. Another issue could be neurologic for example if they have...

Eric Michaels: What are the most common treatments for ED?

Dr. Werner: The most common treatment of course is one of the PDE5 inhibitor (i.e. Viagra, Levitra, or Cialis). Viagra came out in March of 1998 and revolutionized the entire field and American men began to talk about its erection issues and how often and how common it was. All these medications are different but act in the same way. Basically when a man gets excited he sends chemicals to the smooth muscle of the penis which causes it to relax so it activates the trapping mechanism of the arteries. Our body says it doesn't want an erection forevereven if most of us want an erection forever and so we send an enzyme that breaks...


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Want the entire version of this eHealth Radio Episode?


Dr. Michael Werner discusses & answers:

- Talk to us about recent advances in ED Treatment.

- Tell us about the importance of Testosteron.


Contact Information:
Personal Site & Male Sexual Health Info: WernerMD.com
Female Sexual Health Site: CenterForFemaleSexuality.com


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your relationship guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Men, ED, Sexual Health · Comments

December 16, 2010 @ 12:36 pm

Prevention of High Exposures to HIV

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Dr. Adrian Charles Demidont joins the show. His current practice involves primarily care for HIV infected individuals. Additionally, his practice at Callen Lorde serves uninsured patients from all walks of life, providing care for sexually transmitted diseases and complications or STIs. Callen Lorde Community Health Center New York, New York Primary Care for HIV patients.


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Partial Transcript with Interview with Dr. A.C. Demidont


Eric Michaels: What are PEP (post exposure prophylaxis) and PrEP (pre exposure prophylaxis)?

Dr. Demidont: Well Eric those are 2 acronyms that we use for medicatins that we give to people when they have been exposed to HIV. The difference between post exposure prophylaxis and pre exposure prophylaxis. PEP would be given to somebody who after they have been exposed to HIV sexually or through an occupational exposure. PrEP would be medications given to people before their exposure. So basically they are off shoots of original occupational exposures such as needlesticks, blood contaminated spills that people got in hospitals. We are now using these medications for sexual exposures to HIV and a lof of studies are going on about that. Originally most of the studies were done on PEP however in the past few weeks, there has been major studies published on PrEP and utizlizing those medications to prevent HIV infections.

Eric Michaels: What would be considered an exposure? High risk exposure versus low risk exposure?

Dr. Demidont: Basically any sexual contact with somebody infected with HIV would be an exposure. The majority of high risk exposures involve body fluid transmissions such as vaginal secretion or seiman from a HIV infected person to a non HIV infected person. The exposure can be high risk if someone was exposed through anal sex or vaginal sex. A low risk exposure would be an exposure through something like oral sex. The highest risk groups are men, homosexual gay men through anal receptive intercourse - that is THE HIGHEST RISK group that we see...

Eric Michaels: How long is a complete course for PEP? What are the side effects of the medications?

Dr. Demidont: A complete course is typically 28-30 days. There are no written in stone rules about that, most people take the medications for about a month. Different states have different medications which are reccommended through the state and there are often national guidelines which are reccommended as well...


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Want the entire version of this eHealth Radio Episode?


Dr. A.C. Demidont discusses & answers:

- Does PEP work? How successful is the treatment?

- What kind of follow up would one need with their doctor?

- And a Special Tip...


Contact Information:


Site: Callen-Lorde.org


Email: Dr.Demidont@gmail.com


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again for your relationship guide or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Sexual Health · Comments

December 11, 2010 @ 12:31 pm

Could Your Mate Put You at RISK?

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Medical Sociologist and Professor at California Lutheran University, Dr. Adina Nack joined the show. Dr. Nack is also the author of the book "Damaged Goods? Women Living with Incurable STDs". Listen to the informational packed episode with discussion on STDS (Sexually Transmitted Diseases) - there is still hope!


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Dr. Adina Nack is a medical sociologist and professor at California Lutheran University.  Author of the book Damaged Goods? Women Living with Incurable STDs, she has published articles and essays on topics including STD stigma, sex education, and HIV/AIDS. Dr. Nack has written for Ms. Magazine, her academic articles have been reprinted in over a dozen anthologies, and she has won awards for her research, teaching, activism, and public policy work. As a sex educator and sexual health researcher, Dr. Nack has been seen and heard in MTV documentaries, on the CBS show The Doctors, interviewed for magazines like Women's Health, and featured on a variety of radio programs, including NPR and FOX News Radio. For more on Dr. Nack click here.


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Abbreviated Transcript of Interivew with Dr. Adina Nack


Eric Michaels: How do we find out your sexual health status before you start dating & what can we be tested and cannot be tested for?

Dr. Nack: Right now we have the ability to test for a lot of sexually transmitted diseases but not all of them. So if you want a real thorough exam make sure you go with a check list to make sure you get your questions answered and know what you're being tested for. In terms of a blood test, a blood test  can give you results for your HIV status as well as for your Syphilis status - I know it sounds like an archaic disease but unfortunately it's making a comeback recently in the United States. They can also do a culture, a urine culture for men and a vaginal culture for women to test for things like Gonorrhea etc. But unfortunately the 2 viral diseases that are most prevalent which are genital herpes infections and genital HPVs which can also cause genital warts - those 2 viruses can't be tested right now in a definitive way....

Eric Michaels: How or when do we have 'the talk' about your date's sexual history and sexual health?

Dr. Nack: A lot of people think that these are the ta-bu topics; you know, it takes the romance out of things and it can ruin the mood of a date so my advice on that is that you should become really educated about what behaviors you can engage in without risking transmission of STDs and that way if you want and you are feeling shy about that talk you can always just stick to those behaviors which include anything above the waste to be clear about that. But before you get yourself in a position of contracting a disease that could stick with you for the rest of your life.

Eric Michaels: How do we approach navigating the risks when one partner is infected and the other one is not? And why it's important to get over our stereotypes about the 'type of person' who contracts a STD...

Dr. Nack: I think people feel that if a person doesn't look quote on quote slutty or known to be a player they are a good person but a lot of good people have transmitted sexually transmitted diseases from their very first sexual encounters and two of the diseases that are prevalent and can be life long are genital herpes or genital HPV or genital warts - you can technically still get those when you are a virgin. I think it's important when people are having that talk or thinking is this partner going to put them at risk...


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Want the entire version of this eHealth Radio Episode?
Dr. Adina Nack discusses & answers:

- What are The pro's and con's of STD vaccines (for HPV/genital warts, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B)?

- How do we make sure that STD stigma doesn't harm your intimate relationships?

- And a Special Tip...


Web Site: AdinaNack.com


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.


Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Sexual Health · Comments

December 11, 2010 @ 11:11 am

Advice on Sexually Transmitted Infections & Diseases

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Dr. Pierre-Paul Tellier of Montreal's McGill University joins the show. He talks about the terminology between STD's and STI's, what to look for and guard against when it comes to these sexually transmitted infections.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Dr. Pierre-Paul Tellier is a family physician, associate professor & Director of Student Health Services at McGill University. Dr. Pierre-Paul has been involved in research on Human Papilloma Virus for several years and has co-authored  “99 Things Parents Wish They Knew Before…Having “The” Talk” which has recently been released in soft cover.


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Abbreviated Transcript of Our Interview with Dr. Pierre-Paul Tellier


Eric Michaels: What is an STI, is it like an STD, what is the difference anyways?

Dr. Pierre Paul: STD was the alternative that we used to use in fact, it was sort of decided that in common agreement and which made a lot of sense that we use "Sexually Transmitted Infection" (STI) as opposed to "Sexually Transmitted Disease" (STD).  And that is basically because it is more a descriptive term and a more appropriate term and for 2 reasons: First of all, if you say sexually transmitted diseases as opposed for example the old term that used to be used such as venereal diseases it talks about anything that can be transmitted through sex. Essentially if you are having sexual contact with somebody and they happen to have a cold and you pick it up, that technically becomes a sexually transmitted infection. So that's part of it, it is a more general term. Infection is, the fact that when you have a disease, a disease is something that has become a manifestation - something that you can feel and something that you can see. The fact that we now use "Infection" underlines that fact that many people who carry the organisms may they be bacteria or viruses in fact don't manifest in these symptoms and the majority of the people don't. So therefore it is an important factor to underline because you can in fact infect a partner during sexual contact, whatever that might be unknowingly because you are carrying a virus or a bacteria.

Eric Michaels: How come some STIs can be cured and others can’t?

Dr. Pierre-Paul: It kind of depends on what's causing them. For example, an STI that is caused by bacteria versus a virus - these are dis-organisms and the bacteria is in fact an organism which is defined by the fact that you can give an antibiotic and the antibiotic is effective at killing the infection and getting rid of it. Whereas a virus which is an organism which can't be killed by a bacteria, it's an organism which sometimes can be controlled using some medication. Control means that you keep it in check but you don't necessarily get rid of it. That is why some of them can be cured and some of them can not. It depends on the organism that is causing it.

Eric Michaels: What is the most common STI?

Dr. Pierre-Paul: It kind of depends on whether you are talking overall or these sub-categories. Overall the one that is the most common is the one we are doing research on now is Human Papilloma Virus - is EXTREMELY COMMON. It is estimated somewhere in 60-80% of young women that's because a lot of research has been done in young women and are infected with this virus unknowingly because 90% of young women that are infected eseentially do not have symptoms...


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Want the entire version of this eHealth Radio Episode?


Dr. Pierre-Paul discusses & answers:

- I am sure this is a common argument with the younger generation they say...they just have oral sex, do they have to worry about catching an STI?

- How can one protect them self from catching an STI?

- And a Special Tip...


Web Site: "ASK DR. T"


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.
Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Sexual Health · Comments

December 10, 2010 @ 12:20 pm

Can Sexual Activity Help Prevent Sexual Dysfunction?

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Dr. Marcus Laux joins the show to discuss sexual health and sexual dysfunction in men, in a informational packed entertaining episode.


Note: Refer to audio player below to listen to this episode.


Dr. Marcus Laux is a licensed naturopathic physician who earned his doctorate at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Oregon. He has been clinically trained in acupuncture, homeopathy, physical medicine, among other healing modalities.

With 15 years of private family practice, Dr. Laux also stepped out of his office and began searching the world for natural medicines. He has spent 20 years searching the South and Central American jungles, Siberian steppes, across Asia to the European Alps, and Mediterranean laboratories for the most effective therapies nature has to offer. He also presents continuing education lectures for medical doctors and pharmacists worldwide.

Dr. Laux has appeared regularly in the media—including CNN, BBC, and Fox. He has served as the chairman for several scientific advisory boards for leading companies in the field of natural medicine, nutrition, and nutritional supplements. He is the coauthor of Natural Woman, Natural Menopause, published by HarperCollins, and Top Ten Natural Therapies, published by Basic Health Publications.


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Partial Transcript of Interview with Dr. Marcus Laux


Eric Michaels: Where does a man begin in being sexually healthy?

Dr. Laux: Job #1 is the relationship with themselves. A person has to have a solidarity a sexual core - a liking themselves and they have to have a good relationship with their wife as well but it always starts with their person first. I go back when I deal with men and their relationship to how they feel about life, how they feel about sex, where they come from in their relationship with their parents, how did they get along as they were growing up - those things will set the stage for being sexually healthy. Once we get past the interpersonal stuff and the interpersonal relationship then it is about lifestyle, it is going to matter what you eat and how you conduct your life, whether you are getting enough sleep, whether junk food dominates your life, what is your weight - so it is an inside job and it's about how you conduct your life as you go forward.

Eric Michaels: Is sex really good for you, for me, for anyone?

Dr. Laux: Absolutely YES IT IS! I think sex is as critical as breathing and eating for long term health. Sex should be satisfying, sex should be bonding, sex should be making our hearts stronger, relieving our stress hormones, helping tone our muscles, lowering our blood pressure - so I say all that as sex can be harmful if it's not in a loving relationship. Sex can be problematic if their are psychological issues associated with it that don't make this a loving, bonding event. But sex, in and of itself, regardless of religious background, regardless of overlays sex is incredibly important and I find in practice, men and women who have regular satisfying sex are the healthiest people - from heart conditions to joint problems to stress to sleep - it would be my opinion in my clinical experience that sex is mandatory and something to be worked on to have a satisfying sex life.

Eric Michaels: What is the number-one cause of ED?

Dr. Laux: I think it's pretty clear from all the literature whether we look at natural medicine or conventional medicine that ultimately, I would call it stress and inflammation. Inflammation which causes stress within the circulatory system this causes the body to create band-aids inside our arteries and veins those band-aids become what we call plaque, plaque ends up narrowing the blood vessels and the smaller blood vessels that go to the eyes and the ears, the brain and the toes and the penis and all the small areas of the body get compromised the most. When you have decrease in blood flow, you do not have the ability to have a spontaneous quick erection as much ans that is going to be a problem first and foremost for ED.


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Want the entire version of this eHealth Radio Episode?


Dr. Marcus Laux discusses & answers:

- Can sexual activity help prevent sexual dysfunction?

- What are smart every day diet/habits that support a man's sexual health.

- And a Special Tip...


Web Site: 112Degrees.com


Save this to your iPod/mp3 player or the desktop on your computer and listen to it again or simply subscribe to this feed and never miss another episode on eHealth Radio - powered by EDrugStore.md. Refer to audio player and links below.
Note: The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of the show host or it's owners.

Filed under Performance, Men, ED, Sexual Health · Comments

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